September Salon previews

Matthew James Briggs


Radiant Light, for two violins and cello with recorded natural soundscape audio

soundcloud.com/matthewjamesbriggs


Jeremy Shaskus


Transference, a collection of 10 pieces that are based off of drum patterns from electronic dance music, hip hop, and other pop music in a chamber setting. This concept was conceived in 2013 after realizing my dream of being a commercial composer. Like many millennials I grew up listening to hip hop and EDM as well as jazz and classical music. When I returned to Seattle after my stay around New York, I wanted to find a way to capture the sound of my generation and expose my friends that don't play or study music to modern, less mainstream art music. What will be performed is what I have finished of this project which is roughly 4 movements.”

soundcloud.com/jeremy-shaskus


Jay Hamilton


“Jay Hamilton with Maurice Colasurdo and Gordon Frazier as the Turtling Dithers will present 3–4 'songs' from their next 'musical', Nothing is What it Seems. The theme is libraries/books/searching and as the title says, the songs chosen are slightly different from our 'usual' folk/blues style and we hope will show various influences from the musical past.”

soundand.com


Michael Owcharuk

soundcloud.com/michaelowcharuk

Composer’s Salon | Friday, September 4, 2015

An evening of music and discussion with Seattle composers:

  • Matthew James Briggs
  • Michael Owcharuk
  • Jay Hamilton
  • Jeremy Shaskus

Friday, September 4, 2015, 8 pm
Chapel Performance Space
4649 Sunnyside Ave N, 4th Floor
$5–15 donation

Audio samples from our July composers

Keith Eisenbrey



Kam Morrill



Nadya Kadrevis



S. Eric Scribner

Composer’s Salon | Friday, July 10, 2015

An evening of music and discussion with Seattle composers:

  • Keith Eisenbrey
  • Kam Morrill
  • Nadya Kadrevis
  • S. Eric Scribner

Friday, July 10, 2015, 8 pm
Chapel Performance Space
4649 Sunnyside Ave N, 4th Floor
$5–15 donation

Salon preview: Matthew James Briggs

Krzeminski's Star, for violin, marimba, and electronics
Centaurus X-3 (4U 1118-60) is an X-ray pulsar with a period of 4.84 seconds. It was the first X-ray pulsar to be discovered, and the third X-ray source to be discovered in the constellation Centaurus. The system consists of a neutron star orbiting a massive, O-type supergiant star dubbed Krzeminski’s star after its discoverer. Matter is being accreted from the star onto the neutron star, resulting in X-ray emission. (Wikipedia)

The idea that a gigantic star can exist out there, otherwise invisible to us except for a regular burst of X-ray radiation every 4.84 seconds, is truly spectacular. This piece attempts to characterize the sense of wonder and mystery of being such a small creature in such a large universe.

The piece has three internal movements in the form: slow-fast-slow. There is no silence between movements as the electronics make a sonic transition from one to the next.

The first movement sets up the mysterious mood. In the electronics, a wave of sound pulses every 4.84 seconds. NASA transmissions (from STS-31) are used to complete the space theme. The second movement retains a mysterious character but becomes a bit more playful with rhythmic hemiolas and unison melodic lines. The third movement returns to the character of the first as we again ponder the deep.

Matthew James Briggs received his Bachelor of Music from Indiana University where his mentor was Swedish composer Sven-David Sandström and his percussion teacher was Anthony Cirone. matthewjamesbriggs.com

Candice Chin received a BA in music and economics from the University of Washington, where she studied violin with Steven Staryk. She also earned an MBA/MA from the University of Cincinnati. Candice has played with the Northwest Symphony Orchestra, Octava Chamber Orchestra, and Seattle Modern Orchestra. She was a prizewinner in the chamber music category of the Seattle 2011 Russian Piano Festival. She is a member of Philharmonia Northwest, and a student of Martin Friedmann.

Salon preview: Ian McKnight

Reborn in Flame, The Death and Rebirth of a Phoenix, for flute, alto flute and cello

I wrote this piece as a tone poem depicting the life cycle of a phoenix. The piece opens with the old, dying phoenix struggling to hold on to life. This struggle is represented by the opening theme first stated by the cello. The piece relaxes between increasingly dramatic statements of this line as the bird drifts in and out of consciousness, the mysterious dreams expressed by the augmented chords in the cello, and a slower, drifting variation of the opening theme in the flutes.

After the final struggle, the music dies away as the phoenix burns to ash. The music builds into a lament for the dead bird in the form a Gregorian chant. This chant dies away and the dream theme returns in the flute as the ashes are blown away revealing an egg. The excitement brews with the augmented chords starting in the alto flute and joined by the flute and cello. This breaks into trills in the flutes and pizzicato in the cello as the new, baby phoenix hatches from its egg.

The trills in the flute die down as the new, young phoenix theme is stated for the first time by the alto flute. This theme builds as the phoenix soars through the air, its youth represented by the ornaments in the flutes, the pizzicato in the cello, and the new major tonality. The content, youthful phoenix settles to the ground with the final cadence.

Ian McKnight graduated from the University of Idaho with a degree in flute performance in 2012, where he started composing during his senior year. He premiered his first composition, a flute quintet, at the Seattle Flute Festival in 2013. Ian repairs musical instruments at Ted Brown Music in Tacoma, plays piccolo for the Seattle Festival Orchestra, and regularly performs with various chamber ensembles. During his free time he enjoys playing bluegrass, old time, and Celtic folk music on the mandolin and Irish flute. His love of folk music has had a continuing influence on his compositions.