July 2017 Salon previews

Clement Reid

Theater Piece #2

I’ve been putting a group of solo pieces for a program together, and the feeling of this piece is of a long journey, as shown in the first movement, “Narration”, where a particular note series seems to define a road or path. The general sound of the instrument seemed to suggest characterizations, especially in mvt. IV. “Side Shows”, which has a circus-like environment. The piece has been performed on Tacoma New Music and on a concert, At the Western Front, a US-Canada composer exchange program.


Jay Hamilton

Out

Keith Eisenbrey

Ghosting Doubles (second sighting)

Earlier this year—having been dutifully plodding along, working out yet another overly ornate concept for yet another solo piano piece—I was brought up short by Amy Denio’s lovely solo accordion melody “Ghosting”. I immediately knew I wanted to work with it somehow. Amy graciously gave her permission (thank you thank you thank you!) so I ditched the overly ornate and wrote three separate pairs of not-quite-one-to-one counterpoints. Doubles, in the baroque sense: not so much variations as transformative screens or filters. Of those three I will present one: “Ghosting Doubles (second sighting)”.

Jessi Harvey

Eden Untamed

“Reforming the Recognizable” and “Still Here, Anew” are the final two movements of Eden Untamed, a piece dedicated to a fellow composer’s rumination on what it means to be and act as a composer. A short melodic idea of his was the basis of all the harmonic and motivic development to challenge myself to slowly exert as much control as possible over the piece. The third movement is the final condensation of the idea into a single point. The fourth movement is the amalgamation of the structure of the first three movements balanced with a release of, what can vaguely be called, the oppression of caprice.

The first two movements, “Themes Amuck” and “Pieces of the Puzzle”, can be found at: https://soundcloud.com/jessiharvey_composer.

Jeremiah Lawson

Guitar Sonata in D minor

The inspiration for this work in-progress was waking up one Sunday morning in 2016 hearing what the tune “Restoration” from William Walker’s compilation Southern Harmony might sound like if performed by the great Texas Gospel blues slide guitarist Blind Willie Johnson. Movements 3 and 4 together form a traditional sonata form. However, drawing some inspiration from Hepokoski & Darcy’s concept of “rotation” (and some from cumulative form in the work of Charles Ives) I present “Restoration” as the basis for a ragtime theme in the sonata exposition (theme 2) that becomes the set of variations on “Restoration” as a slide guitar homage to Johnson in the recapitulation (aka movement 4), which can also be performed as a stand-alone movement. The third theme/coda material is derived from the subject of a fugue that will be the first movement.

Composers' Salon | Friday, July 7, 2017

An evening of music and discussion with Seattle composers:

  • Keith Eisenbrey
  • Jay Hamilton
  • Jessi Harvey
  • Jeremiah Lawson
  • Clement Reid

Friday, July 7, 2017, 8 pm
Chapel Performance Space
4649 Sunnyside Ave N, 4th Floor
$5–15 suggested donation

May 2017 Salon previews

Patrick O’Keefe

Morning Stroll, a mostly tonal almost-rondo for saxophone quartet

There is an emphasis on quartal intervals and harmonies, some indeterminate and/or poly-tonality, etc., but common practice has not been left very far behind. All in all, it’s pretty typical of my music.

It’s not really programmatic, but you can picture someone with a very short attention span going for a walk—being distracted by anything and everything seen on the walk.

The work will be performed by the Emerald City Saxophone Quartet: Barbara Hubers-Drake, soprano; Molly Pond, alto; Harold Rosenkrans, tenor; Jim Glass, baritone

A computer generated version of this piece, along with other pieces of mine, are on Soundcloud.

Jeremiah Lawson

Guitar Sonata in A major

In 2015 I composed a set of guitar duets I called the Zombie Sonata Rags, where I transformed my favorite themes from the guitar sonatas of Carulli, Diabelli, Giuliani, Matiegka and Sor into the core of rags. Naturally if sonata themes can be transformed into ragtime why shouldn’t ragtime translate into sonata forms? So I’ve been exploring how ragtime can be explored in terms of the developmental procedures and syntax of sonata forms. My recently finished Guitar Sonata in A major is a tribute to the great ragtime composer Scott Joplin.

John Kammerer and Rebekah Ko

new music for marimba + electronics

The piece has at this point evolved to include some percussion elements as well as marimba. The electronics used are sourced largely from vocal samples that are then chopped, pitched and stretched. It is percussive in nature, emphasizing a back and forth hocket-like relationship between the marimba and the electronics, with each part filling in gaps and creating pointillistic gestures that run throughout. Extended techniques on the marimba imitate and compliment the electronic sounds.

John Teske

ad;sr (vectorscores)

I’ll be presenting ad;sr, a work originally for string quartet that was algorithmically generated and captured as a static score. I’ve recreated the score as a “vectorscore”, intended to be a full realization of the work—a generated score for any ensemble and any number of instruments.

vectorscores is a series of new works to be viewed and performed via a lightweight website. The works are algorithmically generated so that each score and performance is unique and customized while still being shaped by the composition’s parameters.

View ad;sr on vectorscores.org

Composers' Salon | Friday, May 5, 2017

An evening of music and discussion with Seattle composers:

  • Patrick O'Keefe
  • Jeremiah Lawson
  • John Kammerer and Rebekah Ko
  • John Teske

Friday, May 5, 2017, 8 pm
Chapel Performance Space
4649 Sunnyside Ave N, 4th Floor
$5–15 suggested donation

March 2017 Salon previews

ComManD

Thaumaturgy

ComManD ensemble presents a composition of music and dance enhanced by technology. Accelerometer information is used to digitally shape and alter acoustic music. Movement, electronics, acoustics and improvisation blend together in both subtle and obvious ways in this work seeking to define it’s own poetics and artistic statement. It’s an attempt to present interdisciplinary work beyond the novelty of what the technology offers— greater than the sum of it’s parts—while simultaneously geeking out on new tech and ideas!

S. Eric Scribner

Tree and Stone

The piece I’ll be playing at the salon is an audience-participation piece called Tree and Stone. Since the piece is aleatory, it would work with another piece at the same time, so I’ll play a preliminary version of The Sherványa Nocturnal Music (share-VAHN-yuh), which relates to my fantasy novel Tond. I’ll hand out the scores and instruments for Tree and Stone and I’ll play the other piece on the piano.

Tond on Amazon
Tree and Stone on Youtube

Blake Degraw

Electronic Quartet for Humans

One of my primary musical interests is in conduction. Over the last few years I’ve been exploring alternative methods of guiding musicians through performances outside of merely waving a hand or baton at them as they read notated music. I will be presenting a piece called Electronic Quartet for Humans, performed on four saxophones, which makes use of pre-recorded audio tracks that the performers listen to through headphones during the performance, guiding their interactions with one another through various aural cues, as well as providing material for them to interpret through mimicry and deep-listening.

Composers' Salon | Friday, March 3, 2017

An evening of music and discussion with Seattle composers:

  • Ivan Arteaga
  • Sheila Bristow
  • Blake Degraw
  • S. Eric Scribner

Friday, March 3, 2017, 8 pm
Chapel Performance Space
4649 Sunnyside Ave N, 4th Floor
$5–15 suggested donation